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Internet Shakespeare Editions

About this text

  • Title: Der bestrafte Brudermord (Fratricide Punished)
  • Author: Anonymous
  • Editor: David Bevington
  • General textual editors: James D. Mardock, Eric Rasmussen
  • Associate textual editor: Donald Bailey
  • Coordinating editor: Michael Best
  • Associate coordinating editor: Janelle Jenstad

  • Copyright David Bevington. This text may be freely used for educational, non-profit purposes; for all other uses contact the Editor.
    Author: Anonymous
    Editor: David Bevington
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Der bestrafte Brudermord (Fratricide Punished)

    275Corambus.
    Corambus
    The Players, I fear, will get a poor recompense, for their play has deeply displeased the King.
    Hamlet
    What say'st thou, old man; they will get a recompense? And if they are ill-rewarded by the King, they will be all the better rewarded by Heaven.
    Corambus
    Your Highness, do actors then get into heaven?
    Hamlet
    Think'st thou, old fool, that they will not find their place there? Wherefore go and treat these people well for me.
    280Corambus
    Yes, I shall treat them as they deserve.
    Hamlet
    Treat them well, I say; for there is no greater praise to be gained than through actors, for they travel far and wide in the world. If they are treated well at one place, they do not know how to praise it enough at the next; for their theatre is a little world, in which they represent all that takes place in the great world. They revive the old forgotten histories, and display to us good and bad examples; they publish abroad the justice and laudable government of princes; they punish vices, and exalt virtues, they praise the good, and show how tyranny is punished ? wherefore you must reward them well.
    Corambus
    Well, they shall certainly have their reward, since they are such great folk. Farewell, Your Highness.
    [Exit.]
    Hamlet
    Come Horatio, I am going, and from this hour4 I shall accordingly seek means to find the King alone, that I may take his life, as he has taken my father's.
    285Horatio
    My lord, consider well, that you come to no harm.
    Hamlet
    I ought, I must, I will this crime repay
    If not by craft, with force I'll make a way!