The mortal pair at the top of the hierarchy, Theseus and Hippolyta, play a minor part in the comedy. They hunt, they celebrate the midsummer festival*, and they get married.

Oberon gives no reason for his desire for the changeling boy, whereas Titania gives a long, poetic defence of her action (2.1.123-37).

Close

But Theseus, like Oberon*, seems to be concerned to maintain male supremacy. He reminds Hippolyta, who is after all an Amazon, the strongest of women:

Oddly enough, the play at times seems to refer to the fesival of May Day, sometimes to Midsummer's Eve.

Go to the page that deals with these festivals.

Close

. . . I wooed thee with my sword,
And won thy love, doing thee injuries
(1.1.16-17)

Footnotes

  1. Oberon and patriarchy

    Oberon gives no reason for his desire for the changeling boy, whereas Titania gives a long, poetic defence of her action (2.1.123-37).

  2. A festival by any other name . . .

    Oddly enough, the play at times seems to refer to the fesival of May Day, sometimes to Midsummer's Eve.

    Go to the page that deals with these festivals.