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  • Title: Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

  • Copyright Internet Shakespeare Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-proift purposes; for all other uses contact the Coordinating Editor.
    Author: William Shakespeare
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

    of Titus Andronicus.
    Tis true, tis true, witnes my kniues sharpe point.
    He stabs the Empresse.
    Emperour. Die franticke wretch for this accursed deede,
    Lucius. Can the sonnes eie behold his father bleede?
    2570Ther's meede for meede, death for a deadly deede.
    Marcus. You sad facde men, people and sons of Rome
    By vprores seuerd as a flight of fowle,
    Scatterd by winds and high tempestuous gusts,
    Oh let me teach you how to knit againe,
    2575This scattered corne into one mutuall sheaffe,
    These broken limbs againe into one bodie.
    Romane Lord. Let Rome herselfe bee bane vnto her
    And shee whome mightie kingdomes cursie too,
    Like a forlorne and desperate castaway,
    2580Doe shamefull execution on herselfe.
    But if my frostie signes and chappes of age,
    Graue witnesses of true experience,
    Cannot induce you to attend my words,
    Speake Roomes deare friend as erst our Ancestor,
    2585when with his solemne tongue he did discourse
    To louesicke Didoes sad attending eare,
    The storie of that balefull burning night,
    VVhen subtile Greekes surprizd King Priams Troy.
    Tell vs what Sinon hath bewicht our eares,
    2590Or who hath brought the fatall engine in
    That giues our Troy, our Rome the ciuill wound.
    My hart is not compact of flint nor steele,
    Nor can I vtter all our bitter greefe,
    But flouds of teares will drowne my Oratorie,
    2595And breake my vttrance euen in the time,
    VVhen it should moue yee to attend me most,
    And force you to commiseration,
    Her's Romes young Captaine let him tell the tale,
    VVhile I stand by and weepe to heare him speake.
    2600Lucius. Then gratious auditorie be it knowne to you,
    That Chiron and the damn'd Demetrius,