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  • Title: Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

  • Copyright Internet Shakespeare Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-proift purposes; for all other uses contact the Coordinating Editor.
    Author: William Shakespeare
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

    The most Lamentable Tragedie
    730Makesway, and runnes like swallowes ore the plaine.
    Demetrius. Chiron we hunt not we, with horse nor hound
    But hope to plucke a daintie Doe to ground.
    Exeuut.
    Enter Aron alone.
    Moore. He that had wit, would thinke that I had none,
    735To burie so much gold vnder a tree,
    And neuer after to inherit it.
    Let him that thinks of me so abiectlie,
    Know that this gold must coine a stratageme,
    VVhich cunninglie effected will beget,
    740A verie excellent peece of villanie:
    And so repose sweet gold for their vnrest,
    That haue their almes out of the Empresse Chest.

    Enter Tamora alone to the Moore.
    Tamora. My louelie Aron, wherefore lookst thou sad,
    VVhen eueriething dorh make a gleefull bost?
    The birds chaunt melodie on euerie bush,
    The snakes lies rolled in the chearefull sunne,
    The greene leaues quiuer with the cooling winde,
    750And make a checkerd shadow on the ground:
    Vnder their sweet shade, Aron let vs sit,
    And whilst the babling eccho mocks the hounds,
    Replying shrillie to the well tun'd hornes,
    As if a double hunt were heard at once,
    755Let vs sit downe and marke their yellowing noyse:
    And after conflict such as was supposde
    The wandring Prince and Dido once inioyed,
    VVhen with a happie storme they were surprisde,
    And curtaind with a counsaile-keeping Caue,
    760VVe may each wreathed in the others armes,
    (Our pastimes done,) possesse a golden slumber,
    VVhiles hounds and hornes, and sweete mellodious birds
    Be vnto vs as is a Nurces song
    Of Lullabie, to bring her Babe asleepe.
    Moore,