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  • Title: Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

  • Copyright Internet Shakespeare Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-proift purposes; for all other uses contact the Coordinating Editor.
    Author: William Shakespeare
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)

    of Titus Andronicus.
    To coole this heate, a charme to calme these fits,
    Per Stigia, per manes Vehor.

    Enter Titus Andronicus, and his three sonnes.
    700making a noise with hounds & hornes.
    Titus. The hunt is vp the Moone is bright and gray,
    The fields are fragrant, and the woods are greene,
    Vncouple here, and let vs make a bay,
    And wake the Emperour, and his louelie Bride,
    705And rowze the Prince, and ring a Hunters peale,
    That all the Court may eccho with the noise.
    Sonnes let it be your charge, as it is ours,
    To attend the Emperours person carefullie:
    I haue beene troubled in my sleepe this night,
    710But dawning day new comfort hath inspirde.

    Here a crie of Hounds, and wind hornes in a peale: then
    enter Saturninus, Tamora, Bascianus, Lauinia, Chiron,
    Demetrius, and their Attendants.

    715Titus. Many good morrowes to your Maiestie,
    Madam to you as many, and as good,
    I promised your Grace a Hunters peale.
    Saturnine. And you haue rung it lustilie my Lords,
    Somewhat too earlie for new married Ladies.
    720Bascianus. Lauinia, how say you?
    Laui. I say no: I haue been broad awake, two howres &
    Saturnine. Come on then, horse and Chariots let vs haue,
    And to our sport: Madam, now shall ye see,
    725Our Romane hunting.
    Marcus. I haue Dogges my Lord,
    VVill rouze the prowdest Panther in the Chase,
    And clime the highest promontarie topp.
    Titus. And I haue horse will follow where the game