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  • Title: Two Noble Kinsmen (Quarto, 1634)

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    Author: William Shakespeare
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Two Noble Kinsmen (Quarto, 1634)

    The Two Noble Kinsmen.
    2505His age, some six and thirtie. In his hand
    He beares a charging Staffe, embost with silver.
    Thes. Are they all thus?
    Per. They are all the sonnes of honour.
    Thes. Now as I have a soule I long to see 'em,
    2510Lady you shall see men fight now.
    Hip. I wish it,
    But not the cause my Lord; They would show
    Bravely about the Titles of two Kingdomes;
    Tis pitty Love should be so tyrannous:
    2515O my soft harted Sister, what thinke you?
    Weepe not, till they weepe blood; Wench it must be.
    Thes. You have steel'd 'em with your Beautie: honord
    To you I give the Feild; pray order it,
    Fitting the persons that must use it.
    2520Per. Yes Sir.
    Thes. Come, Ile goe visit 'em: I cannot stay.
    Their fame has fir'd me so; Till they appeare,
    Good Friend be royall.
    Per. There shall want no bravery.
    2525Emilia. Poore wench goe weepe, for whosoever wins,
    Looses a noble Cosen, for thy sins.
    Scæna 3.
    Enter Iailor, Wooer, Doctor.
    Doct. Her distraction is more at some time of the Moone,
    Then at other some, is it not?
    2530Iay. She is continually in a harmelesse distemper, sleepes
    Little, altogether without appetite, save often drinking,
    Dreaming of another world, and a better; and what
    Broken peece of matter so'ere she's about, the name
    Palamon lardes it, that she farces ev'ry busines
    Enter Daughter.
    Withall, fyts it to every question; Looke where
    Shee comes, you shall perceive her behaviour.
    Daugh. I have forgot it quite; The burden o'nt, was downe
    A downe a, and pend by no worse man, then
    2540Giraldo, Emilias Schoolemaster; he's as
    Fantasticall too, as ever he may goe upon's legs,
    For in the next world will Dido see Palamon, and