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  • Title: Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 1, 1597)
  • Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
  • ISBN: 1-55058-299-2

    Copyright Internet Shakespeare Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-proift purposes; for all other uses contact the Coordinating Editor.
    Author: William Shakespeare
    Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 1, 1597)

    The excellent Tragedie

    3100And Ile informe you how these things fell out.
    Iuliet here slaine was married to that Romeo,
    3106.1Without her Fathers or her Mothers grant:
    3140The Nurse was priuie to the marriage.
    The balefull day of this vnhappie marriage,
    VVas Tybalts doomesday: for which Romeo
    3110VVas banished from hence to Mantua.
    He gone, her Father sought by foule constraint
    To marrie her to Paris: but her Soule
    (Loathing a second Contract) did refuse
    3116.1To giue consent; and therefore did she vrge me
    Either to finde a meanes she might auoyd
    What so her Father sought to force her too:
    Or els all desperately she threatned
    Euen in my presence to dispatch her selfe.
    Then did I giue her, (tutord by mine arte)
    A potion that should make her seeme as dead:
    And told her that I would with all post speed
    Send hence to Mantua for her Romeo,
    That he might come and take her from the Toombe.
    3125But he that had my Letters (Frier Iohn)
    3125.1Seeking a Brother to associate him,
    VVhereas the sicke infection remaind,
    VVas stayed by the Searchers of the Towne.
    3126.1But Romeo vnderstanding by his man,
    That Iuliet was deceasde, returnde in post
    Vnto Verona for to see his loue.
    VVhat after happened touching Paris death,
    3126.5Or Romeos is to me vnknowne at all.
    But when I came to take the Lady hence,
    I found them dead, and she awakt from sleep:
    VVhom faine I would haue taken from the tombe,
    VVhich she refused seeing Romeo dead.
    3126.0Anone I heard the watch and then I fled,
    VVhat afterhappened I am ignorant of.
    And if in this ought haue miscaried