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  • Title: Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 1, 1597)
  • Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
  • ISBN: 1-55058-299-2

    Copyright Internet Shakespeare Editions. This text may be freely used for educational, non-proift purposes; for all other uses contact the Coordinating Editor.
    Author: William Shakespeare
    Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
    Not Peer Reviewed

    Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 1, 1597)

    The excellent Tragedie

    Mer: Nothing King of Cates, but borrow one of your
    1510nine liues, therefore come drawe your rapier out of your
    scabard, least mine be about your eares ere you be aware.
    1515Rom: Stay Tibalt, hould Mercutio: Benuolio beate
    downe their weapons.
    1517.1
    Tibalt under Romeos arme thrusts Mer-
    cutio, in and flyes.
    Mer: Is he gone, hath hee nothing? A poxe on your
    houses.
    Rom: What art thou hurt man, the wound is not deepe.
    1530Mer: Noe not so deepe as a Well, nor so wide as a
    barne doore, but it will serue I warrant. What meant you to
    come betweene vs? I was hurt vnder your arme.
    Rom: I did all for the best.
    1540Mer: A poxe of your houses, I am fairely drest. Sirra
    goe fetch me a Surgeon.
    1528.1Boy: I goe my Lord.
    Mer: I am pepperd for this world, I am sped yfaith, he
    hath made wormes meate of me, & ye aske for me to mor-
    row you shall finde me a graue-man. A poxe of your houses,
    1542.1I shall be fairely mounted vpon foure mens shoulders: For
    your house of the Mountegues and the Capolets: and then
    some peasantly rogue, some Sexton, some base slave shall
    write my Epitapth, that Tybalt came and broke the Princes
    1542.5Lawes,and Mercutio was slaine for the first and second
    cause. Wher's the Surgeon?
    Boy: Hee's come sir.
    Mer: Now heele keepe a mumbling in my guts on the
    other side, come Benuolio, lend me thy hand: a poxe of your
    Exeunt
    Rom: This Gentleman the Princes neere Alie.
    My very frend hath tane this mortall wound
    1545In my behalfe, my reputation staind
    With Tibalts slaunder, Tybalt that an houre
    Hath beene my kinsman. Ah Iuliet
    Thy