Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: W. L. Godshalk
Peer Reviewed

Troilus and Cressida (Quarto 1, 1609)


of Troylus and Cresseida.
Hector would haue them fall vpon him thus.
Cozen all honor to thee.
Aiax. I thanke thee Hector,
Thou art to gentle, and too free a man,
2705I came to kill thee cozen, and beare hence,
A great addition earned in thy death.
Hect. Not Neoptolymus so mirable,
On whose bright crest, fame with her lowdst (O yes)
Cries, this is he, could promise to himselfe,
2710A thought of added honor, torne from Hector.
Æne. There is expectance heere from both the sides,
What further you will do.
Hect. Weele answer it,
The issue is embracement, Aiax farewell.
2715Aiax. If I might in entreaties finde successe,
As seld I haue the chance, I would desire,
My famous cosin to our Grecian tents.
Diom. Tis Agamemnons wish, and great Achilles
Doth long to see vnarm'd the valiant Hector.
2720Hect. Æneas call my brother Troylus to me.
And signifie this louing enterview
To the expectors of our Troyan part,
Desire them home. Giue me thy hand my Cozen.
I will go eate with thee, and see your Knights.
Aiax. Great Agamemnon comes to mecte vs heere.
Hect. The worthiest of them, tell me name by name:
But for Achilles my owne searching eyes,
Shall finde him by his large and portly size.
2730Agam. Worthy all armes, as welcome as to one,
That would be rid of such an enemy.
From heart of very heart, great Hector welcome.
Hect. I thanke thee most imperious Agamemnon.
2740Agam. My well-fam'd Lord of Troy, no lesse to you.
Mene. Let me confirme my princely brothers greeting:
You brace of warlike brothers: welcome hether.
Hect. Who must we answer?
Æne. The noble Menelaus.
2745Hect. O you my Lord, by Mars his gauntlet thankes,
I3
(Mock