Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: W. L. Godshalk
Peer Reviewed

Troilus and Cressida (Quarto 1, 1609)


of Troylus and Cresseida.
My sequent protestation, bee thou true, and I will see thee.
2455Cres. Oh you shalbe exposd my Lord to dangers,
As infinite as imminent: but ile be true.
Troy. And ile grow friend with danger, were this sleeue.
Cres. And you this gloue, when shall I see you?
Troy. I will corrupt the Grecian centinells,
To giue thee nightly visitation, but yet be true.
Cres. Oh heauens be true againe?
2465Troy. Here why I speake it loue,
The Grecian youths are full of quality,
And swelling ore with arts and excercise:
How nouelty may moue, and parts with portion,
2470Alas a kinde of Godly iealousie,
(Which I beseech you cal a vertuous sinne,)
Makes me a feard.
Cres. Oh heauens you loue mee not!
Troy. Die I a villaine then,
2475In this I do not call your faith in question:
So mainely as my merit. I cannot sing
Nor heele the high lauolt, nor sweeten talke,
Nor play at subtill games, faire vertues all:
To which the Grecians are most prompt and pregnant,
2480But I can tell that in each grace of these:
There lurkes a still, and dumb-discoursiue diuell
That tempts most cunningly, but be not tempted.
Cres. Do you thinke I will?
Troy. No, but somthing may be done that we will not,
2485And sometimes we are diuells to ourselues:
When we will tempt the frailty of our powers,
Presuming on their changefull potency.
Eneaswithin. Nay good my Lord?
Troy. Come kisse, and let vs part.
2490Pariswithin. Brother Troylus?
Troy. Good brother come you hither?
And bring Eneas and the Grecian with you.
Cres. My Lord will you be true?
Troy. Who I, alas it is my vice, my fault,
2495Whiles others fish with craft for great opinion,
I with