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Author: William Shakespeare
Editors: Hardy M. Cook, Ian Lancashire
Peer Reviewed

Shake-speares Sonnets (Quarto 1, 1609)


SHAKE-SPEARES

2260But rysing at thy name doth point out thee,
As his triumphant prize,proud of this pride,
He is contented thy poore drudge to be
To stand in thy affaires,fall by thy side.
No want of conscience hold it that I call,
2265Her loue,for whose deare loue I rise and fall.

I52

IN louing thee thou know'st I am forsworne,
But thou art twice forsworne to me loue swearing,
In act thy bed-vow broake and new faith torne,
2270In vowing new hate after new loue bearing:
But why of two othes breach doe I accuse thee,
When I breake twenty:I am periur'd most,
For all my vowes are othes but to misuse thee:
And all my honest faith in thee is lost.
2275For I haue sworne deepe othes of thy deepe kindnesse:
Othes of thy loue,thy truth,thy constancie,
And to inlighten thee gaue eyes to blindnesse,
Or made them swere against the thing they see.
For I haue sworne thee faire:more periurde eye,
2280To swere against the truth fo foule a lie.

I53

CVpid laid by his brand and fell a sleepe,
A maide of Dyans this aduantage found,
And his loue-kindling fire did quickly steepe
2285In a could vallie-fountaine of that ground:
Which borrowd from this holie fire of loue,
A datelesse liuely heat still to indure,
And grew a seething bath which yet men proue,
Against strang malladies a soueraigne cure:
2290But at my mistres eie loues brand new fired,
The boy for triall needes would touch my brest,
I sick withall the helpe of bath desired,
And thether hied a sad distemperd guest.
But found no cure,the bath for my helpe lies,
2295Where Cupid got new fire;my mistres eye.
I54