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Author: William Shakespeare
Editors: Hardy M. Cook, Ian Lancashire
Peer Reviewed

Shake-speares Sonnets (Quarto 1, 1609)


SONNETS.

I was not sick of any feare from thence.
But when your countinance fild vp his line,
Then lackt I matter,that infeebled mine.


FArewell thou art too deare for my possessing,
And like enough thou knowst thy estimate,
The Charter of thy worth giues thee releasing:
My bonds in thee are all determinate.
1295For how do I hold thee but by thy granting,
And for that ritches where is my deseruing?
The cause of this faire guift in me is wanting,
And so my pattent back againe is sweruing.
Thy selfe thou gau'st,thy owne worth then not knowing,
1300Or mee to whom thou gau'st it,else mistaking,
So thy great guift vpon misprision growing,
Comes home againe,on better iudgement making.
Thus haue I had thee as a dreame doth flatter,
In sleepe a King,but waking no such matter.


VVHen thou shalt be dispode to set me light,
And place my merrit in the eie of skorne,
Vpon thy side,against my selfe ile fight,
And proue thee virtuous,though thou art forsworne:
1310With mine owne weakenesse being best acquainted,
Vpon thy part I can set downe a story
Of faults conceald,wherein I am attainted:
That thou in loosing me shall win much glory:

And I by this wil be a gainer too,
1315For bending all my louing thoughts on thee,
The iniuries that to my selfe I doe,
Doing thee vantage,duble vantage me.
Such is my loue,to thee I so belong,
That for thy right,my selfe will beare all wrong.


SAy that thou didst forsake mee for some falt,
And I will comment vpon that offence,
F 3
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