Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


The most lamentable Tragedie
Ro. Not hauing that, which hauing, makes thē short.
170Ben. In loue.
Rom. Out.
Ben. Of loue.
Rom. Out of her fauour where I am in love.
Ben. Alas that loue so gentle in his view,
175Should be so tirannous and rough in proofe.
Romeo. Alas that loue, whose view is muffled still,
Should without eyes, see pathwaies to his will:
Where shall we dine? ô me! what fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I haue heard it all:
180Heres much to do with hate, but more with loue:
Why then ô brawling loue, ô louing hate,
O any thing of nothing first created:
O heauie lightnesse, serious vanitie,
Mishapen Chaos of welseeming formes,
185Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fier, sicke health,
Still waking sleepe that is not what it is.
This loue feele I, that feele no loue in this,
Doest thou not laugh?
Benu. No Coze, I rather weepe.
190Rom. Good hart at what?
Benu. At thy good harts oppression.
Romeo. Why such is loues transgression:
Griefes of mine owne lie heauie in my breast,
Which thou wilt propogate to haue it preast,
195With more of thine, this loue that thou hast showne,
Doth ad more griefe, too too much of mine owne.
Loue is a smoke made with the fume of sighes,
Being purgd, a fire sparkling in louers eies,
Being vext, a sea nourisht with louing teares,
200What is it else? a madnesse, most discreete,
A choking gall, and a preseruing sweete:
Farewell my Coze.
Ben. Soft I will go along:
And if you leaue me so, you do me wrong.
But