Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


of Romeo and Iuliet.
Min. What a pestilent knaue is this same?
2720 M. 2. Hang him Iack, come weele in here, tarrie for the mour-
ners, and stay dinner.
2721.1
Exit.
Enter Romeo.
Ro. If I may trust the flattering truth of sleepe,
My dreames presage some ioyfull newes at hand,
2725My bosomes L. sits lightly in his throne:
And all this day an vnaccustomd spirit,
Lifts me aboue the ground with chearfull thoughts,
I dreamt my Lady came and found me dead,
Strange dreame that giues a deadman leaue to thinke,
2730And Breathd such life with kisses in my lips,
That I reuiude and was an Emperor.
Ah me, how sweete is loue it selfe possest
When but loues shadowes are so rich in ioy.
Enter Romeos man.
2735Newes from Verona, how now Balthazer,
Dost thou not bring me Letters from the Frier?
How doth my Lady, is my Father well:
How doth my Lady Iuliet? that I aske againe,
For nothing can be ill if she be well.
2740Man. Then she is well and nothing can be ill,
Her body sleepes in Capels monument,
And her immortall part with Angels liues.
I saw her laid lowe in her kindreds vault,
And presently tooke poste to tell it you:
2745O pardon me for bringing these ill newes,
Since you did leaue it for my office sir.
Rom. Is it in so? then I denie you starres.
Thou knowest my lodging, get me inke and paper,
2750And hire post horses, I will hence tonight.
Man. I do beseech you sir, haue patience:
Your lookes are pale and wilde, and do import
Some misaduenture.
Ro. Tush thou art deceiu'd,
2755Leaue me, and do the thing I bid thee do.
Hast