Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


of Romeo and Iuliet.
Out you greene sicknesse carrion, out you baggage,
You tallow face.
La. Fie, fie, what are you mad?
2200Iu. Good Father, I beseech you on my knees,
Heare me with patience, but to speake a word.
Fa. Hang thee young baggage, disobedient wretch,
I tell thee what, get thee to Church a Thursday,
Or neuer after looke me in the face.
2205Speake not, replie not, do not answere me.
My fingers itch, wife, we scarce thought vs blest
That God had lent vs but this onely childe,
But now I see this one is one too much,
And that we haue a curse in hauing her:
2210Out on her hilding.
Nur. God in heauen blesse her:
You are to blame my Lord to rate her so.
Fa. And why my Lady wisdome, hold your tongue,
Good Prudence smatter, with your gossips go.
2215Nur. I speake no treason,
Father, ô Godigeden,
May not one speake?
Fa. Peace you mumbling foole,
Vtter your grauitie ore a Goships bowle,
2220For here we need it not.
Wi. You are too hot.
Fa. Gods bread, it makes me mad,
Day, night, houre, tide, time, worke, play,
Alone in companie, still my care hath bene
2225To haue her matcht, and hauing now prouided
A Gentleman of noble parentage,
Of faire demeanes, youthfull and nobly liand,
Stuft as they say, with honourable parts,
Proportiond as ones thought would wish a man,
2230And then to haue a wretched puling foole,
A whining mammet, in her fortunes tender,
To answere, ile not wed, I cannot loue:
I am too young, I pray you pardon me.
I
But