Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


of Romeo and Iuliet.
Tis but the pale reflex of Cinthias brow.
Nor that is not the Larke whose noates do beate
The vaultie heauen so high aboue our heads,
2055I haue more care to stay then will to go:
Come death and welcome, Iuliet wills it so.
How ist my soule? lets talke it is not day.
Iu. It is, it is, hie hence be gone away:
It is the Larke that sings so out of tune,
2060Straining harsh Discords, and vnpleasing Sharpes.
Some say, the Larke makes sweete Diuision:
This doth not so: for she diuideth vs.
Some say the Larke and loathed Toad change eyes,
O now I would they had changd voyces too:
2065Since arme from arme that voyce doth vs affray,
Hunting thee hence, with Hunts up to the day.
O now be gone, more light and light it growes.
Romeo. More light and light, more darke and darke our
2068.1woes.
Enter Madame and Nurse.
2070Nur. Madam.
Iu. Nurse.
Nur. Your Lady Mother is cūming to your chāber,
The day is broke, be wary, looke about.
Iuli. Then window let day in, and let life out.
2075Ro. Farewell, farewell, one kisse and Ile descend.
Iu. Art thou gone so loue, Lord, ay husband, friend,
I must heare from thee euery day in the houre,
For in a minute there are many dayes,
O by this count I shall be much in yeares,
2080Ere I againe behold my Romeo.
Rom. Farewell:
I will omit no opportunitie,
That may conuey my greetings loue to thee.
Iu. O thinkst thou we shall euer meete againe?
2085Rom. I doubt it not, and allthese woes shall serue
For sweete discourses in our times to come.
H 3
Iu. O