Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


The most lamentable Tragedie
Digressing from the valour of a man,
1945Thy deare loue sworne but hollow periurie,
Killing that loue which thou hast vowd to cherish,
Thy wit, that ornament, to shape and loue,
Mishapen in the conduct of them both:
Like powder in a skillesse souldiers flaske,
1950Is set a fier by thine owne ignorance,
And thou dismembred with thine owne defence.
What rowse thee man, thy Iuliet is aliue,
For whose deare sake thou wast but lately dead.
There art thou happie, Tybalt would kill thee,
1955But thou slewest Tibalt, there art thou happie.
The law that threatned death becomes thy friend,
And turnes it to exile, there art thou happie.
A packe of blessings light vpon thy backe,
Happines courts thee in her best array,
1960But like a mishaued and sullen wench,
Thou puts vp thy fortune and thy loue:
Take heede, take heede, for such die miserable.
Go get thee to thy loue as was decreed,
Ascend her chamber, hence and comfort her:
1965But looke thou stay not till the watch be set,
For then thou canst not passe to Mantua,
Where thou shalt liue till we can find a time
To blaze your marriage, reconcile your friends,
Beg pardon of the Prince and call thee backe,
1970With twentie hundred thousand times more ioy
Then thou wentst forth in lamentation.
Go before Nurse, commend me to thy Lady,
And bid her hasten all the house to bed,
Which heauie sorrow makes them apt vnto,
1975Romeo is comming.
Nur. O Lord, I could haue staid here all the night,
To heare good counsell, oh what learning is:
My Lord, ile tell my Lady you will come.
Ro. Do so, and bid my sweete prepare to chide.
Nur. Here