Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Roger Apfelbaum
Peer Reviewed

Romeo and Juliet (Quarto 2, 1599)


of Romeo and Iuliet.
Iu. A rime I learnt euen now
Of one I danct withall.
One cals within Iuliet.
Nurs. Anon, anon:
730Come lets away, the strangers all are gone.
Exeunt.
Chorus.
Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie,
And young affection gapes to be his heire,
735That faire for which loue gronde for and would die,
With tender Iuliet match, is now not faire.
Now Romeo is beloued, and loues againe,
Alike bewitched by the charme of lookes:
But to his foe supposd he must complaine,
740And she steale loues sweete bait from fearful hookes:
Being held a foe, he may not haue accesse
To breathe such vowes as louers vse to sweare,
And she as much in loue, her meanes much lesse,
To meete her new beloued any where:
745But passion lends them power, time meanes to meete,
Tempring extremities with extreeme sweete.
Enter Romeo alone.
Ro. Can I go forward when my heart is here,
Turne backe dull earth and find thy Center out.
750
Enter Benuolio with Mercutio.
Ben. Romeo, my Cosen Romeo, Romeo.
Mer. He is wise, and on my life hath stolne him home to bed.
Ben. He ran this way and leapt this Orchard wall.
755Call good Mercutio:
Nay Ile coniure too.
Mer. Romeo, humours, madman, passion louer,
Appeare thou in the likenesse of asigh,
Speake but on rime and I am satisfied:
760Crie but ay me, prouaunt, but loue and day,
Speake to my goship Venus one faire word,
One nickname for her purblind sonne and her,
D
Young