Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Adrian Kiernander
Peer Reviewed

Richard the Third (Quarto 1, 1597)


The Tragedy
King Art thou indeed?
Tir. Proue me my gracious soueraigne,
2665King Darst thou resolue to kill a friend of mine?
Tir. I my Lord, but I had rather kill two enemies.
King Why there thou hast it two deepe enemies,
Foes to my rest, and my sweet sleepes disturbs,
2670Are they that I would haue thee deale vpon:
Tirrel I meane those bastards in the tower.
Tir. Let me haue open meanes to come to them,
And soone ile rid you from the feare of them.
King Thou singst sweet musicke. Come hither Tirrel,
Go by that token, rise and lend thine eare, he wispers in his eare.
Tis no more but so, saie is it done,
And I will loue thee and prefer thee too.
Tir. Tis done my gracious lord.
2679.1 KingShal we heare from thee Tirrel ere we sleep? Enter Buc.
Tir. Ye shall my lord,
Buck. My lord, I haue considered in my mind,
The late demand that you did sound me in.
King Well, let that passe, Dorset is fled to Richmond.
Buck I heare that newes my lord.
2685King Stanley he is your wifes sonnes. Wel looke to it.
Buck. My lord, I claime your gift, my dew by promise,
For which your honor and your faith is pawnd,
The Earledome of Herford and the moueables,
2690The which you promised I should possesse.
King Stanley looke to your wife, if she conuay
Letters to Richmond you shall answere it.
Buck. What saies your highnes to my iust demand.
King As I remember, Henrie the sixt
2695Did prophecie that Richmond should be king,
When Richmond was a little peeuish boy:
A king perhaps, perhaps.
Buck. My lord.
2697.1King How chance the prophet could not at that time,
Haue told me I being by, that I should kill him.
Buck. My lord, your promise for the Earledome.
King Richmond, when last I was at Exeter,
.5The Maior in curtesie showd me the Castle,
And