Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Adrian Kiernander
Peer Reviewed

Richard the Third (Quarto 1, 1597)


The Tragedy
Hast. Whats a clocke?
Mess. Vpon the stroke of foure.
Hast. Cannot thy Master sleepe these tedious nights?
Mess. So it should seeme by that I haue to say:
First he commends him to your noble Lordship.
1805Hast. And then. Mes. And then he sends you word.
He dreamt to night the beare had raste his helme:
Besides, he saies there are two councels held,
And that may be determined at the one,
1810Which may make you and him to rewe at the other,
Therefore he sends to know your Lordships pleasure:
If presently you will take horse with him,
And with all speede post into the North,
To shun the danger that his soule diuines.
1815Hast. Go fellow go, returne vnto thy Lord,
Bid him not feare the seperated counsels:
His honour and my selfe are at the one,
And at the other, is my seruant Catesby:
Where nothing can proceede that toucheth vs,
1820Whereof I shall not haue intelligence.
Tell him his feares are shallow, wanting instance.
And for his dreames, I wonder he is so fond,
To trust the mockery of vnquiet slumbers,
To flie the boare, before the boare pursues vs,
1825Were to incense the boare to follow vs,
And make pursuite where he did meane no chase:
Go bid thy Master rise and come to me,
And we will both together to the tower,
Where he shall see the boare will vse vs kindely.
1830Mess. My gratious Lo: Ile tell him what you say.
Enter
Cat. Many good morrowes to my noble Lo:
Hast. Good morrow Catesby, you are early stirring,
1835What newes what newes, in this our tottering state?
Cat. It is a reeling world indeede my Lo:
And I beleeue it will neuer stand vpright,
Till Richard weare the garland of the Realme.
Hast. Howe? weare the garland? doest thou meane the
Cat. I my good Lord.
Hast.