Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Catherine Lisak
Peer Reviewed

Richard II (Quarto 1, 1597)


King Richard the second.
2455Then my poore life must answere.
Du. Thy life answere?
yor. Bring me my bootes, I will vntothe King.
2458.1
His man enters with his bootes.
Du. Strike him Aumerle, poore boy thou art amazd,
2460Hence vilaine neuer more come in my sight.
Yor. Giue me my bootes I say.
Du. Why Yorke what wilt thou doe?
Wilt thou not hide the trespasse of thine owne?
Haue we more sons? or are we like to haue?
2465Is not my teeming date drunke vp with time?
And wilt thou plucke my faire sonne from mine age?
And rob me of a happie mothers name,
Is he not like the? is he not thine owne?
Yor. Thou fond mad woman,
2470Wilt thou conceale this darke conspiracie?
A doozen of them here haue tane the sacrament,
And interchaungeably set downe there hands,
To kill the king at Oxford.
Du. He shal be none, weele keepe him heere,
2475Then what is that to him?
Yor. Away fond woman, were he twentie times my sonne,
Iwould appeach him.
Du. Hadst thou groand for him as I haue done,
Thou wouldst bee more pittifull.
2480But nowe I knowe rhy minde, thou doest suspect
That I haue been disloiall to thy bed,
And that he is a bastard, not thy sonne:
Sweete Yorke, sweete husband, be not of that mind,
He is as like thee as a man may be,
2485Not like to me, or any of my kinne,
And yet I loue him.
Yor. Make way vnrulie woman.
Exit.
Du. After Aumerle: mount thee vpon his horse,
Spur, post, and get before him to the King,
2490And beg thy pardon ere he do accuse thee,
Ile not be long behind, though I be old,
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