Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
95

For thou hast kild the sweetest innocent,
That ere did lift vp eye.
Oth. O she was foule:
I scarce did know you Vncle, there lies your Niece,
3490Whose breath indeed, these hands haue newly stopt,
I know this act shewes terrible and grim.
Gra. Poore Desdemona, I am glad thy father's dead,
Thy match was mortall to him, and pure griefe,
3495Shore his old thread atwane: did he liue now,
This sight would make him doe a desperate turne,
Yea curse his better Angell from his side,
And fall to reprobation.
Oth. Tis pittifull, but yet Iago knowes,
3500That she with Cassio, hath the act of shame
A thousand times committed; Cassio confest it,
And she did gratifie his amorous workes,
With the recognisance and pledge of loue,
Which I first gaue her; I saw it in his hand,
3505It was a handkercher; an Antique token
My father gaue my mother.
Em. O God, O heauenly God.
Iag. Zouns, hold your peace.
Em. 'Twill out, 'twill: I hold my peace sir, no,
3510I'le be in speaking, liberall as the ayre,
Let heauen, and men, and diuells, let em all,
All, all cry shame against me, yet I'le speake.
Iag. Be wise, and get you home.
Em. I will not.
3515Gra. Fie, your sword vpon a woman?
Em. O thou dull Moore, that handkercher thou speakst on,
I found by fortune, and did giue my husband:
For often with a solemne earnestnesse,
3520More then indeed belong'd to such a trifle,
He beg'd of me to steale it.
Iag. Villainous whore.
Em. She gaue it Cassio? no alas I found it,
And I did giu't my husband.
M 4
Iag.