Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


92
The Tragedy of Othello

Oth. What voyce is this? not dead? not yet quite dead?
I that am cruell, am yet mercifull,
I would not haue thee linger in thy paine, --- so, so.
3350Em. What ho, my Lord, my Lord.
Oth. Who's there?
Em. O good my Lord, I'de speake a word with you.
Oth. Yes, tis Emillia, by and by: shee's dead:
3355Tis like she comes to speake of Cassios death;
The noyse was here; ha, no more mouing,
Still as the graue: shall she come in? were't good?
I thinke she stirres againe; no, what's the best?
If she come in, shee'll sure speake to my wife.
3360My wife, my wife, my wife; I ha no wife;
O insupportable: O heauy houre.
Me thinks it should be now a huge Ecclips
Of Sunne and Moone, and that the affrighted Globe,
Should yawne at alteration.
3365Em. I doe beseech you I may speake with you, -good my Lord.
Oth. I had forgot thee: O come in Emillia.
Soft, by and by; let me the Curtaines draw,
Ent. Emil.
Where art thou? whats the matter with thee now?
Em. O my good Lord, yonder's foule murders done.
Oth. What, now?
Em. But now my Lord.
3375Oth. It is the very error of the Moone,
She comes more neere the earth, then she was wont,
And makes men mad.
Em. Cassio my Lord has kil'd a yong Venetian,
Cal'd Roderigo.
3380Oth. Roderigo kild, and Cassio kild?
Em. No, Cassio is not kild.
Oth. Not Cassio kild, then murders out of tune,
And sweete reuenge growes harsh.
Des. O falsly, falsly murdered.
3385Em. O Lord, what cry is that?
Oth. That? what?
Em. Out and alas, it is my Ladyes voyce,
Helpe,