Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


80
The Tragedy of Othello

To beare a part in this: patience a while good Cassio:
3190Lend me a light; know we this face, or no?
Alas my friend, and my deare countrey man:
Roderigo? no, yes sure: O heauen Roderigo.
Gra. What of Venice?
Iag. Euen he sir, did you know him?
3195Gra. Know him? I.
Iag. Seignior Gratiano, I cry you gentle pardon:
These bloody accidents must excuse my manners,
That so neglected you.
Gra. I am glad to see you.
3200Iag. How doe you Cassio? O a chaire, a chaire.
Gra. Roderigo.
Iag. He, tis he: O that's well said, a chaire:
Some good man beare him carefully from hence,
3205I'le fetch the Generalls Surgeon: for you mistrisse,
Saue you your labour, he that lies slaine here Cassio,
Was my deare friend, what malice was betwixt you?
Cas. None in the world, nor doe I know the man.
Iag. What, looke you pale? O beare him out o'th aire.
3210Stay you good Gentlewoman, looke you pale mistrisse?
Doe you perceiue the ieastures of her eye,
Nay, an you stirre, we shall haue more anon:
Behold her well I pray you, looke vpon her,
Doe you see Gentlemen? Nay guiltinesse
Will speake, though tongues were out of vse.
Enter Em.
Em. 'Las what's the matter? what's the matter husband?
Iag. Cassio has here bin set on in the darke,
By Roderigo, and fellowes that are scap't,
3220Hee's almost slaine, and Roderigo dead.
Em. Alas good gentleman, alas good Cassio.
Iag. This is the fruite of whoring, pray Emillia,
Goe know of Cassio, where he supt to night:
What, doe you shake at that?
3225Bian. He supt at my house, but I therefore shake not.
Iag. O did he so, I charge you goe with me.
Em. Fie, fie vpon thee strumpet.
Bian.