Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


the Moore of Venice.
5

Bra. This thou shalt answer, I know thee Roderigo.
Rod. Sir, I will answer any thing: But I beseech you,
If she be in her chamber, or your house,
Let loose on me the Iustice of the state,
For this delusion.
Bra. Strike on the tinder, Ho:
155Giue me a taper, call vp all my people:
This accident is not vnlike my dreame,
Beleefe of it oppresses me already:
Light I say, light.
Iag. Farewell, for I must leaue you,
160It seemes not meete, nor wholesome to my pate,
To be produc'd, as if I stay I shall
Against the Moore, for I doe know the state,
How euer this may gaule him with some checke,
Cannot with safety cast him, for hee's imbark'd,
165With such loud reason, to the Cipres warres,
Which euen now stands in act, that for their soules,
Another of his fathome, they haue not
To leade their businesse, in which regard,
Tho I doe hate him, as I doe hells paines,
170Yet for necessity of present life,
I must shew out a flag, and signe of loue,
Which is indeed but signe, that you shall surely
Finde him: lead to the Sagittar, the raised search,
And there will I be with him. So farewell.
Exit.
175
Enter Barbantio in his night gowne, and seruants
with Torches.

Bra. It is too true an euill, gone she is,
And what's to come, of my despised time,
Is nought but bitternesse now Roderigo,
Where didst thou see her; O vnhappy girle,
180With the Moore saist thou? who would be a father?
How didst thou know twas she? O thou deceiuest me
Past thought: what said she to you? get more tapers,
B 3
Raise