Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
57

Intirely to her loue: But if she lost it,
Or made a gift of it: my fathers eye
2210Should hold her lothely, and his spirits should hunt
After new fancies: she dying, gaue it me,
And bid me when my fate would haue me wiue,
To giue it her; I did so, and take heede on't,
Make it a darling, like your pretious eye,
2215To loose, or giue't away, were such perdition,
As nothing else could match.
Desd. I'st possi}ble?
Oth. Tis true, there's magicke in the web of it,
A Sybell that had numbred in the world,
2220The Sun to make two hundred compasses,
In her prophetique fury, sowed the worke;
The wormes were hallowed that did breed the silke,
And it was died in Mummy, with the skilfull
Conserues of maidens hearts.
2225Des. Ifaith i'st true?
Oth. Most veritable, therefore looke to't well.
Des. Then would to God, that I had neuer seene it.
Oth. Ha, wherefore?
Des. Why doe you speake so startingly and rashly.
2230Oth. I'st lost? i'st gone? speake, is it out o'the way?
Des. Heauen blesse vs.
Oth. Say you?
Des. It is not lost, but what and if it were?
Oth. Ha.
2235Des. I say it is not lost.
Oth. Fetch't, let me see it,
Des. Why so I can sir, but I will not now,
This is a tricke, to put me from my suite,
I pray let Cassio, be receiu'd againe.
2240Oth. Fetch me that handkercher, my mind misgiues.
Des. Come, come, you'll neuer meete a more sufficient man.
Oth. The handkercher.
2244.1Des. I pray talke me of Cassio.
Oth. The handkercher.
I
Des.