Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
55

2120VVhat bloody worke so euer.
Oth. I greete thy loue:
Not with vaine thankes, but with acceptance bounteous,
And will vpon the instant put thee to't,
VVithin these three dayes, let me heare thee say,
2125That Cassio's not aliue,
Iag. My friend is dead:
Tis done as you request, but let her liue.
Oth. Dam her lewd minks: O dam her,
Come, goe with me apart, I will withdraw
To furnish me with some swift meanes of death,
For the faire diuell: now art thou my Leiutenant.
2135Iag. I am your owne for euer.
Exeunt.
Enter Desdemonia Emilla and the Clowne.
Des}. Do you know sirra, where the Leiutenant Cassio lies?
2140Clo. I dare not say he lies any where.
Des. VVhy man?
He is a Souldier, and for one to say a Souldier lies, is stabbing.
Des. Go to, where lodges he?
2145Clo. I know not where he lodges, and for me to deuise a lodging,
2145.1and say he lies there, were to lie in my throate.
Desd. Can you inquire him out, and be edified by report?
Clo, I will cathechize the world for him, that is, make questions
And by them answer.
2155Desd. Seeke him, bid him come hither, tell him I haue moued my
Lord in his behalfe, and hope all will be well.
Clo. To doe this is within the compasse of a man, and therefore
I'le attempt the doing of it.
Exit.
2160Desd. VVhere should I loose that handkercher Emillia?
Em. I know not Madam.
Des. Beleeue me, I had rather loose my purse
Full of Crusadoes: and but my noble Moore
2165Is true of minde, and made of no such basenesse,
As iealous creatures are, it were enough,
To put him to ill thinkiug.
Em. Is he not iealous:
H4
Des.