Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


50
The Tragedy of Othello

Your dinner, and the generous Ilander
By you inuited, doe attend your presence,
1915Oth. I am to blame.
Des. Why is your speech so faint? are you not well?
Oth. I haue a paine vpon my forehead, here.
Des. Faith that's with watching, t'will away againe;
1920Let me but bind your head, within this houre
It will be well againe.
Oth. Your napkin is too little:
Let it alone, come I'le goe in with you.
Des. I am very sorry that you are not well.
1925Em. I am glad I haue found this napkin,
Ex. Oth. and
This was her first remembrance from the Moore,
My wayward husband, hath a hundred times
Wooed me to steale it, but she so loues the token,
For he coniur'd her, she should euer keepe it,
1930That she reserues it euer more about her,
To kisse, and talke to; I'le ha the worke taine out,
And giu't Iago: what hee'll doe with it,
Heauen knowes, not I,
Enter Iago.
I nothing know, but for his fantasie.
Iag. How now, what doe you here alone?
Em. Doe not you chide, I haue a thing for you.
Iag. A thing for me, it is a common thing.
1940Em. Ha?
Iag. To haue a foolish thing.
Em. O, is that all? what will you giue me now,
For that same handkercher?
Iag. What handkercher?
1945Em. What handkercher?
Why that the Moore first gaue to Desdemona,
That which so often you did bid me steale.
Iag. Ha'st stole it from her?
Em. No faith, she let it drop by negligence,
1950And to the aduantage, I being here, took't vp:
Looke here it is.
Iag. A good wench, gine it me.
Em.