Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
45

When Cassio left my wife: what didst not like?
And when I told thee, he was of my counsell,
In my whole course of wooing, thou cridst indeed?
1720And didst contract, and purse thy brow together,
As if thou then hadst shut vp in thy braine,
Some horrible counsell: if thou doest loue me,
Shew me thy thought.
Iag. My Lord, you know I loue you.
1725Oth. I thinke thou doest,
And for I know, thou art full of loue and honesty,
And weighest thy words, before thou giue em breath,
Therefore these stops of thine affright me the more:
For such things in a false disloyall knaue,
1730Are trickes of custome; but in a man that's iust,
They are close denotements, working from the heart,
That passion cannot rule.
Iag. For Michael Cassio,
I dare presume, I thinke that he is honest,
1735Oth. I thinke so to.
Iag. Men should be that they seeme,
Or those that be not, would they might seeme none.
Oth. Certaine, men should be what they seeme.
Iag. Why then I thinke Cassio's an honest man.
1740Oth. Nay yet there's more in this,
I preethee speake to me to thy thinkings:
As thou doest ruminate, and giue the worst of thought,
The worst of word.
Iag. Good my Lord pardon me;
1745Though I am bound to euery act of duty,
I am not bound to that all slaues are free to,
Vtter my thoughts? Why, say they are vile and false:
As where's that pallace, whereinto foule things
Sometimes intrude not? who has a breast so pure,
1750But some vncleanely apprehensions,
Keepe leetes and law-dayes, and in Session sit
With meditations lawfull?
Oth. Thou doest conspire against thy friend Iago,
G 3
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