Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
43

If I haue any grace or power to moue you,
His present reconsiliation take:
For if he be not one that truely loues you,
That erres in ignorance, and not in cunning,
1645I haue no iudgement in an honest face,
I preethee call him backe.
Oth. Went he hence now?
Desd. Yes faith, so humbled,
That he has left part of his griefes with me,
1650I suffer with him; good loue call him backe.
Oth. Not now sweete Desdemona some other time.
Desd. But shal't be shortly?
Oth. The sooner sweete for you.
Desd. Shal't be to night at supper?
1655Oth. No, not to night.
Desd. To morrow dinner then?
Oth. I shall not dine at home,
I meete the Captaines, at the Cittadell.
Desd. Why then to morrow night, or Tuesday morne,
1660On Tuesday morne, or night, or Wensday morne,
I preethee name the time, but let it not
Exceed three dayes: Ifaith hee's penitent,
And yet his trespasse, in our common reason,
(Saue that they say, the warres must make examples,
1665Out of her best) is not almost a fault,
To incurre a priuate checke: when shall he come?
Tell me Othello: I wonder in my soule,
What you could aske me, that I should deny?
Or stand so muttering on? What Michael Cassio?
1670That came a wooing with you, and so many a time
When I haue spoke of you dispraisingly,
Hath tane your part, to haue so much to doe
To bring him in? Birlady I could doe much.
Oth. Preethee no more, let him come when he will,
1675I will deny thee nothing.
Desd. Why this is not a boone,
Tis as I should intreate you weare your gloues:
G2
Or