Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
33

Should hazard such a place, as his owne second,
1255With one of an ingraft infirmity:
It were an honest action to say so to the Moore.
Iag. Nor I, for this faire Island:
I doe loue Cassio well, and would doe much,
Helpe, helpe, within.
1260To cure him of this euill: but harke, what noyse.

Enter Cassi}o,driuing in Roderigo.
Cas. Zouns, you rogue, you rascall.
Mon. What's the matter Leiutenant?
Cas. A knaue, teach mee my duty: but I'le beate the knaue into
1265a wicker bottle.
Rod. Beate me?
Cas. Doest thou prate rogue?
Mon. Good Leiutenant; pray sir hold your hand.
1270Cas. Let me goe sir, or ile knocke you ore the mazzard.
Mon. Come, come, you are drunke.
Cas. Drunke?
they fight.
Iag. Away I say, goe out and cry a muteny.
A bell rung.
1275Nay good Leiutenant: godswill Gentlemen,
Helpe ho, Leiutenant: Sir Montanio, sir,
Helpe maisters, here's a goodly watch indeed,
Who's that that rings the bell? Diablo --- ho,
The Towne will rise, godswill Leiutenant, hold,
1280You will be sham'd for euer.

Enter Othello, and Gentlemen with weapons.

Oth. What is the matter here?
Mon. Zouns, I bleed still, I am hurt, to the death:
Oth. Hold, for your liues.
1285Iag. Hold, hold Leiutenant, sir Montanio, Gentlemen,
Haue you forgot all place of sence, and duty:
Hold, the Generall speakes to you; hold, hold, for shame.
Oth. Why how now ho, from whence arises this?
Are we turn'd Turkes, and to our selues doe that,
1290Which Heauen has forbid the Ottamites:
F
For