Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


The Moore of Venice.
23

835The diuine Desdemona.
Mon. What is she?
Cas. She that I spoke of, our great Captains Captaine,
Left in the conduct of the bold Iago.
840Whose footing here anticipates our thoughts
A sennights speede ---great Ioue Othello guard,
And swell his saile with thine owne powerfull breath,
That he may blesse this Bay with his tall shippe,
And swiftly come to Desdemona's armes.

Enter Desdemona, Iago, Emillia, and Roderigo
.
845Giue renewd fire,
To our extincted spirits.
845.1And bring all Cypresse comfort, ---O behold
The riches of the ship is come ashore.
Ye men of Cypres, let her haue your knees:
850Haile to thee Lady: and the grace of heauen,
Before, behinde thee, and on euery hand,
Enwheele thee round.
Desd. I thanke you valiant Cassio:
What tidings can you tell me of my Lord?
855Cas. He is not yet arriued, nor know I ought,
But that hee's well, and will be shortly here.
Desd. O but I feare: ---how lost you company?
[within.]
A saile, a saile.
Cas. The great contention of the sea and skies
860Parted our fellowship: but harke, A saile.
Gent. They giue their greeting to the Cittadell,
This likewise is a friend.
Cas. So speakes this voice:
865Good Ancient, you are welcome, welcome Mistresse,
Let it not gall your patience, good Iago,
That I extend my manners, tis my breeding,
That giues me this bold shew of courtesie.
Iag. For would she giue you so much of her lips,
870As of her tongue, she has bestowed on me,
You'd haue enough.
D 4
Desd.