Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


the Moore of Venice.
17

In my defunct, and proper satisfaction,
615But to be free and bounteous of her mind,
And heauen defend your good soules that you thinke
I will your serious and good businesse scant,
For she is with me; --- no, when light-winged toyes,
And feather'd Cupid foyles with wanton dulnesse,
620My speculatiue and actiue instruments,
That my disports, corrupt and taint my businesse,
Let huswiues make a skellett of my Helme,
And all indigne and base aduersities,
Make head against my reputation.
625Du. Be it, as you shall priuately determine,
Either for stay or going, the affaires cry hast,
And speede must answer, you must hence to night,
627.1Desd. To night my Lord?
Du. This night.
Oth. With all my heart.
630Du. At ten i'the morning here weel meete againe.
Othello, leaue some officer behind,
And he shall our Commission bring to you,
With such things else of quality or respect,
As doth concerne you.
635Oth. Please your Grace, my Ancient,
A man he is of honesty and trust,
To his conueyance I assigne my wife,
With what else needefull your good Grace shall thinke,
To be sent after me.
640Du. Let it be so:
Good night to euery one, and noble Seignior,
If vertue no delighted beauty lacke,
Your son in law is farre more faire then blacke.
1 Sena. Adue braue Moore, vse Desdemona well.
645Bra. Looke to her Moore, haue a quicke eye to see,
She has deceiu'd her father, may doe thee.
Exeunt.
Oth. My life vpon her faith: honest Iago,
My Desdemona must I leaue to thee,
I preethee let thy wife attend on her,
D
And