Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Donald L. Bailey
Peer Reviewed

Othello (Quarto 1, 1622)


16
The Tragedy of Othello

Oth. The tyrant custome most great Senators,
Hath made the flinty and steele Cooch of warre,
My thrice driuen bed of downe: I doe agnize
580A naturall and prompt alacrity,
I finde in hardnesse, and would vndertake
This present warres against the Ottamites,
Most humbly therefore, bending to your State,
I craue fit disposition for my wife,
585Due reuerence of place and exhibition,
Which such accomodation? and besort
As leuels with her breeding.
Du. If you please, bee't at her fathers.
Bra. Ile not haue it so.
590Oth. Nor I.
Desd. Nor I, I would not there reside,
To put my father in impatient thoughts,
By being in his eye: most gracious Duke,
To my vnfolding lend a gracious eare,
595And let me finde a charter in your voyce,
And if my simplenesse. ----
Du. What would you ----speake.
Des. That I did loue the Moore, to liue with him,
My downe right violence, and scorne of Fortunes,
600May trumpet to the world: my hearts subdued,
Fuen to the vtmost pleasure of my Lord:
I saw Othelloes vissage in his minde,
And to his Honors, and his valiant parts
Did I my soule and fortunes consecrate:
605So that deere Lords, if I be left behinde,
A Mothe of peace, and he goe to the warre,
The rites for which I loue him, are bereft me,
And I a heauy interim shall support,
By his deare absence, let me goe with him.
610Oth. Your voyces Lords: beseech you let her will,
Haue a free way, I therefore beg it not
To please the pallat of my appetite,
Nor to comply with heate, the young affects
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