Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: James D. Mardock
Peer Reviewed

Henry V (Quarto 1, 1600)


2525
Enter Flewellen, and Captaine Gower.
Flew. Godes plud kil the boyes and the lugyge,
Tis the arrants peece of knauery as can be desired,
In the worell now, in your conscience now.
2530Gour. Tis certaine, there is not a Boy left aliue,
And the cowerdly rascals that ran from the battell,
Themselues haue done this slaughter:
Beside, they haue carried away and burnt,
All that was in the kings Tent:
Whervpon the king caused euery prisoners
2535Throat to be cut. O he is a worthy king.
Flew. I he was born at Monmorth.
Captain Gower, what call you the place where
Alexander the big was borne?
Gour. Alexander the great.
2540Flew. Why I pray, is nat big great?
As if I say, big or great, or magnanimous,
I hope it is all one reconing,
Saue the frase is a litle varation.
Gour. I thinke Alexander the great
Was borne at Macedon
2545His father was called Philip of Macedon,
As I take it.
Flew. I thinke it was Macedon indeed where Alexander
Was borne: looke you captaine Gower,
And if you looke into the mappes of the worell well,
You shall finde litle difference betweene
Macedon and Monmorth. Looke you, there is
A Riuer in Macedon, and there is also a Riuer
In Monmorth, the Riuers name at Monmorth,
Is called Wye.
But tis out of my braine, what is the name of the other:
But tis all one, tis so like, as my fingers is to my fingers,
2555And there is Samons in both.
2555.1Looke you captaine Gower, and you marke it,
You shall finde our King is come after Alexander.
God knowes, and you know, that Alexander in his
Bowles, and his alles, and his wrath, and his displeasures,
And indignations, was kill his friend Clitus.
Gower. I but our King is not like him in that,
For he neuer killd any of his friends.
Flew. Looke you, tis not well done to take the tale out
Of a mans mouth, ere it is made an end and finished:
I speake in the comparisons, as Alexander is kill
His friend Clitus: so our King being in his ripe
2570Wits and iudgements, is turne away, the fat knite
With the great belly doublet: I am forget his name.
Gower. Sir Iohn Falstaffe.
2575Flew. I, I thinke it is Sir Iohn Falstaffe indeed,
I can tell you, theres good men borne at Monmorth.
Enter King and the Lords.
2580King. I was not angry since I came into France,
Vntill this houre.
Take a trumpet Herauld,
And ride vnto the horsmen on yon hill:
If they will fight with vs bid them come downe,
Or leaue the field, they do offend our sight:
2585Will they do neither, we will come to them,
And make them skyr away, as fast
As stones enforst from the old Assirian slings.
Besides, weele cut the throats of those we haue,
And not one aliue shall taste our mercy.
Enter the Herauld.
Gods will what meanes this? knowst thou not
That we haue fined these bones of ours for ransome?
Herald. I come great king for charitable fauour,
To sort our Nobles from our common men,
2602.1We may haue leaue to bury all our dead,
Which in the field lye spoyled and troden on.
Kin. I tell thee truly Herauld, I do not know whether
The day be ours or no:
For yet a many of your French do keep the field.
Hera. The day is yours.
Kin. Praised be God therefore.
What Castle call you that?
Hera. We call it Agincourt.
2620Kin. Then call we this the field of Agincourt.
Fought on the day of Cryspin, Cryspin.
Flew. Your grandfather of famous memorie,
2622.1If your grace be remembred,
2625Is do good seruice in France.
Kin. Tis true Flewellen.
Flew. Your Maiestie sayes verie true.
2627.1And it please your Maiestie,
The Wealchmen there was do good seruice,
In a garden where Leekes did grow.
And I thinke your Maiestie wil take no scorne,
To weare a Leake in your cap vpon S. Dauies day.
2635Kin. No Flewellen, for I am wealch as well as you.
Flew. All the water in VVye wil not wash your wealch
Blood out of you, God keep it, and preserue it,
To his graces will and pleasure.
2640Kin. Thankes good countryman.
Flew. By Iesus I am your Maiesties countryman:
I care not who know it, so long as your maiesty is an honest
2645K. God keep me so. Our Herald go with him,
And bring vs the number of the scattred French.
2648.1
Exit Heralds.
Call yonder souldier hither.
2650Flew. You fellow come to the king.
Kin. Fellow why doost thou weare that gloue in thy hat?
Soul. And please your maiestie, tis a rascals that swagard
With me the other day: and he hath one of mine,
Which if euer I see, I haue sworne to strike him.
So hath he sworne the like to me.
K. How think you Flewellen, is it lawfull he keep his oath?
2662.1Fl. And it please your majesty, tis lawful he keep his vow.
If he be periur'd once, he is as arrant a beggerly knaue,
As treads vpon too blacke shues.
Kin. His enemy may be a gentleman of worth.
Flew. And if he be as good a gentleman as Lucifer
And Belzebub, and the diuel himselfe,
Tis meete he keepe his vowe.
Kin. Well sirrha keep your word.
Vnder what Captain seruest thou?
Soul. Vnder Captaine Gower.
Flew. Captaine Gower is a good Captaine:
2680And hath good littrature in the warres.
Kin. Go call him hither.
Soul. I will my Lord.
Exit souldier.
Kin. Captain Flewellen, when Alonson and I was
2685Downe together, I tooke this gloue off from his helmet,
Here Flewellen, weare it. If any do challenge it,
He is a friend of Alonsons,
And an enemy to mee.
Fle. Your maiestie doth me as great a fauour
As can be desired in the harts of his subiects.
2690I would see that man now that should chalenge this gloue:
And it please God of his grace. I would but see him,
That is all.
Kin. Flewellen knowst thou Captaine Gower?
2695Fle. Captaine Gower is my friend.
And if it like your maiestie, I know him very well.
Kin. Go call him hither.
Flew. I will and it shall please your maiestie.
2700Kin. Follow Flewellen closely at the heeles,
The gloue he weares, it was the souldiers:
It may be there will be harme betweene them,
For I do know Flewellen valiant,
And being toucht, as hot as gunpowder:
2710And quickly will returne an iniury.
Go see there be no harme betweene them.