Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: James D. Mardock
Peer Reviewed

Henry V (Quarto 1, 1600)


of Henry the fift.
1570.1Altho we did seeme dead, we did but slumber.
Now we speake vpon our kue, and our voyce is imperiall,
England shall repent her folly: see her rashnesse,
1575And admire our sufferance. Which to raunsome,
His pettinesse would bow vnder:
1580For the effusion of our blood, his army is too weake:
For the disgrace we have borne, himselfe
Kneeling at our feete, a weake and worthlesse satisfaction.
To this, adde defyance. So much from the king my maister.
King. What is thy name? we know thy qualitie.
Herald. Montioy.
King. Thou dost thy office faire, returne thee backe,
1590And tell thy King, I do not seeke him now:
But could be well content, without impeach,
To march on to Callis: for to say the sooth,
Though tis no wisdome to confesse so much
Vnto an enemie of craft and vantage.
1595My souldiers are with sicknesse much infeebled,
My Army lessoned, and those fewe I haue,
Almost no better then so many French:
Who when they were in heart, I tell thee Herauld,
I thought vpon one paire of English legges,
1600Did march three French mens.
Yet forgiue me God, that I do brag thus:
This your heire of France hath blowne this vice in me.
I must repent, go tell thy maister here I am,
My raunsome is this frayle and worthlesse body,
1605My Army but a weake and sickly guarde.
Yet God before, we will come on,
If France and such an other neighbour stood in our way:
1610If we may passe, we will: if we be hindered,
We shal your tawny ground with your red blood discolour.
So Montioy get you gone, there is for your paines:
The sum of all our answere is but this,
We would not seeke a battle as we are:
D 2
Nor