Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Not Peer Reviewed

Titus Andronicus (Quarto 1, 1594)


of Titus Andronicus.
VVhere life hath no more interest but to breath.
Marcus. Alas poore hart, that kisse is comfortlesse,
1400As frozen water to a starued snake.
Titus. VVhen will this fearefull slumber haue an end?
Mar. Now farewell flattrie, die Andronicus,
Thou dost not slumber, see thy two sonnes heads,
Thy warlike hand, thy mangled Daughter heere:
1405Thy other banisht sonne with this deere sight,
Strucke pale and bloodlesse, and thy brother I,
Euen like a stony image cold and numme.
Ah now no more will I controwle thy greefes,
Rent off thy siluer haire, thy other hand,
1410Gnawing with thy teeth, and be this dismall sight
The closing vp of our most wretched eies:
Now is a time to storme, why art thou still?
Titus. Ha, ha, ha.
M. VVhy dost thou laugh? It fits not with this houre.
1415Titus. VVhy I haue not another teare to shed;
Besides this sorrow is an enemie,
And would vsurpe vpon my watrie eies,
And make them blinde with tributarie teares.
Then which way shall I find Reuenges Caue,
1420For these two heads doe seeme to speake to mee
And threat me, I shall neuer come to blisse,
Till all these mischiefes be returnd againe,
Euen in their throats that hath commited them.
Come let me see what taske I haue to doe,
1425You heauie people cirkle me about.
That I may turne mee to each one of you,
And sweare vnto my soule to right your wrongs,
The vow is made. Come brother take a head,
And in this hand the other will I beare,
1430And Lauinia thou shalt be imployde in these Armes,
Beare thou my hand sweet wench betweene thy teeth:
As for thee boy, goe get thee from my sight,
F3
Thou