Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Not Peer Reviewed

Two Noble Kinsmen (Quarto, 1634)


The Two Noble Kinsmen.
The mellencholly humour that infects her.
Wooer. I am of your minde Doctor.
Enter Iaylor, Daughter, Maide.
2885Doctor. You'l finde it so; she comes, pray honour her.
Iaylor. Come, your Love Palamon staies for you childe,
And has done this long houre, to visite you.
Daughter. I thanke him for his gentle patience,
He's a kind Gentleman, and I am much bound to him,
2890Did you nev'r see the horse he gave me?
Iaylor. Yes.
Daugh. How doe you like him?
Iaylor. He's a very faire one.
Daugh. You never saw him dance?
2895Iaylor. No.
Daugh. I have often.
He daunces very finely, very comely,
And for a Iigge, come cut and long taile to him,
He turnes ye like a Top.
2900Iaylor. That's fine indeede.
Daugh. Hee'l dance the Morris twenty mile an houre,
And that will founder the best hobby-horse
(If I have any skill) in all the parish,
And gallops to the turne of Light a'love,
2905What thinke you of this horse?
Iaylor. Having these vertues
I thinke he might be broght to play at Tennis.
Daugh. Alas that's nothing.
Iaylor. Can he write and reade too.
2910Daugh. A very faire hand, and casts himselfe th' accounts
Of all his hay and provender: That Hostler
Must rise betime that cozens him; you know
The Chestnut Mare the Duke has?
Iaylor. Very well.
2915Daugh. She is horribly in love with him, poore beast,
But he is like his master coy and scornefull.
Iaylor. What dowry has she?
Daugh. Some two hundred Bottles,
And twenty strike of Oates, but hee'l ne're have her;
He