Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Not Peer Reviewed

Two Noble Kinsmen (Quarto, 1634)


The Two Noble Kinsmen.
And what shall I doe then? Ile bring a beavy,
2240A hundred blacke eyd Maides, that love as I doe
With Chaplets on their heads of Daffadillies,
With cherry-lips, and cheekes of Damaske Roses,
And all wee'l daunce an Antique fore the Duke,
And beg his pardon; Then she talk'd of you Sir;
2245That you must loose your head to morrow morning,
And she must gather flowers to bury you,
And see the house made handsome, then she sung
Nothing but Willow, willow, willow, and betweene
Ever was, Palamon, faire Palamon,
2250And Palamon, was a tall yong man. The place
Was knee deepe where she sat; her careles Tresses,
A wreake of bull-rush rounded; about her stucke
Thousand fresh water flowers of severall cullors.
That me thought she appeard like the faire Nimph
2255That feedes the lake with waters, or as Iris
Newly dropt downe from heaven; Rings she made
Of rushes that grew by, and to 'em spoke
The prettiest posies: Thus our true love's tide,
This you may loose, not me, and many a one:
2260And then she wept, and sung againe, and sigh'd,
And with the same breath smil'd, and kist her hand.
2. Fr. Alas what pitty it is?
Wooer. I made in to her.
She saw me, and straight sought the flood, I sav'd her,
2265And set her safe to land: when presently
She slipt away, and to the Citty made,
With such a cry, and swiftnes, that beleeve me
Shee left me farre behinde her; three, or foure,
I saw from farre off crosse her, one of 'em
2270I knew to be your brother, where she staid,
And fell, scarce to be got away: I left them with her.
Enter Brother, Daughter, and others.
And hether came to tell you: Here they are.
Daugh. May you never more enjoy the light, &c.
2275Is not this a fine Song?
Bro. O a very fine one.
Daugh.