Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Janelle Jenstad
Not Peer Reviewed

The Merchant of Venice (Quarto 1, 1600)


the Merchant of Venice.
2270and for your loue ile take this ring from you,
doe not draw back your hand, ile take no more,
and you in loue shall not denie me this?
Bass. This ring good sir, alas it is a trifle,
I will not shame my selfe to giue you this?
2275Por. I will haue nothing else but onely this,
and now me thinks I haue a minde to it?
Bass. There's more depends on this then on the valew,
the dearest ring in Venice will I giue you,
and finde it out by proclamation,
2280onely for this I pray you pardon me?
Por. I see sir you are liberall in offers,
you taught me first to beg, and now me thinks
you teach me how a begger should be aunswerd.
Bass. Good sir, this ring was giuen me by my wife,
2285and when she put it on, she made me vowe
that I should neither sell, nor giue, nor loose it.
Por. That scuse serues many men to saue their gifts,
and if your wife be not a mad woman,
and know how well I haue deseru'd this ring,
2290she would not hold out enemy for euer
for giuing it to me: vvell, peace be with you.
Exeunt.
Anth. My L. Bassanio, let him haue the ring,
let his deseruings and my loue withall
be valued gainst your wiues commaundement.
2295Bass. Goe Gratiano, runne and ouer-take him,
giue him the ring, and bring him if thou canst
vnto Anthonios house, away, make hast.
Exit Gratiano.
Come, you and I will thither presently,
and in the morning early will we both
2300flie toward Belmont, come Anthonio.
Exeunt.
Enter Nerrissa.
Por. Enquire the Iewes house out, giue him this deed,
and let him signe it, weele away to night,
2305and be a day before our husbands home:
this deede will be well welcome to Lorenzo?
I.
Enter