Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Suzanne Westfall
Not Peer Reviewed

A Midsummer Night's Dream (Quarto 1, 1600)


A Midsommer nightes dreame.
The. I wonder, if the Lyon be to speake.
Demet. No wonder, my Lord. One Lyon may, when
many Asses doe.
1955
Exit Lyon, Thysby, and Mooneshine.
Wall. In this same enterlude it doth befall,
That I, one Flute (by name) present a wall:
And such a wall, as I would haue you thinke
That had in it a cranied hole or chinke:
1960Through which the louers, Pyramus, and Thisby,
Did whisper often, very secretly.
This lome, this roughcast, and this stone doth showe,
That I am that same wall: the truth is so.
And this the cranie is, right and sinister,
1965Through which the fearefull louers are to whisper.
The. Would you desire lime and haire to speake better?
Deme. It is the wittiest partition, that euer I heard dis-
course my Lord.
1970The. Pyramus drawes neare the wall: silence.
Py. O grim lookt night, o night, with hue so blacke,
O night, which euer art, when day is not:
O night, O night, alacke, alacke, alacke,
1975I feare my Thisbyes promise is forgot.
And thou ? wall, ? sweete, ? louely wall,
That standst betweene her fathers ground and mine,
Thou wall, ? wall, O sweete and louely wall,
Showe mee thy chinke, to blink through, with mine eyne.
1980Thankes curteous wall. Ioue shield thee well, for this.
But what see I? No Thisby doe I see.
O wicked wall, through whome I see no blisse,
Curst be thy stones, for thus deceiuing mee.
The. The wall mee thinkes, being sensible, should curse
1985againe.
Pyr. No, in truth Sir, he should not. Deceiuing mee is
Thisbyes cue: she is to enter now, and I am to spy
Her through the wall. You shall see it will fall
H
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