Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Not Peer Reviewed

Hamlet (Quarto 1, 1603)


The Tragedy of Hamlet
Would treason haue pronounced,
For if the gods themselues had seene her then,
When she saw Pirrus with malitious strokes,
1555Mincing her husbandes limbs,
It would haue made milch the burning eyes of heauen,
And passion in the gods.
1560Cor Looke my lord if he hath not changde his colour,
And hath teares in his eyes: no more good heart, no more.
Ham. T'is well, t'is very well, I pray my lord,
Will you see the Players well bestowed,
I tell you they are the Chronicles
1565And briefe abstracts of the time,
After your death I can tell you,
You were better haue a bad Epiteeth,
Then their ill report while you liue.
Cor. My lord, I will vse them according to their deserts.
1570Ham. O farre better man, vse euery man after his deserts,
Then who should scape whipping?
Vse them after your owne honor and dignitie,
The lesse they deserue, the greater credit's yours.
1575Cor. Welcome my good fellowes.
exit.
Ham. Come hither maisters, can you not play the mur-
der of Gonsago?
players Yes my Lord.
1580Ham. And could'st not thou for a neede study me
Some dozen or sixteene lines,
Which I would set downe and insert?
players Yes very easily my good Lord.
Ham. T'is well, I thanke you: follow that lord:
And doe you heare sirs? take heede you mocke him not.
1584.1Gentlemen, for your kindnes I thanke you,
1585And for a time I would desire you leaue me.
1585.1Gil. Our loue and duetie is at your commaund.
Exeunt all but Hamlet.
1590Ham. Why what a dunghill idiote slaue am I?
Why these Players here draw water from eyes:
For