Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Sonia Massai
Not Peer Reviewed

Edward III (Quarto 1, 1596)


The Raigne of King
How now.
Enter Lodwike.
Lo. My liege the drum that stroke the lusty march,
Stands with Prince Edward your thrice valiant sonne.
900
Enter Prince Edward.
King. I see the boy, oh how his mothers face,
Modeld in his, corrects my straid desire,
And rates my heart, and chides my theeuish eie,
Who being rich ennough in seeing her,
905Yet seeke elsewhere and basest theft is that,
Which cannot cloke it selfe on pouertie.
Now boy, what newes?
Pr. E. I haue assembled my deare Lord and father,
The choysest buds of all our English blood,
910For our affaires to Fraunce, and heere we come,
To take direction from your maiestie.
Kin: Still do I see in him deliniate,
His mothers visage, those his eies are hers,
Who looking wistely on me, make me blush:
915For faults against themselues, giue euidence,
Lust as a fire, and me like lanthorne show,
Light lust within them selues; euen through them selues:
A way loose silkes or wauering vanitie,
Shall the large limmit offaire Brittayne.
920By me be ouerthrowne, and shall I not,
Master this little mansion of my selfe;
Giue me an Armor of eternall steele,
I go to conquer kings, andshall I not then
Subdue my selfe, and be my enimies friend,
925It must not be, come boy forward, aduaunce,
Lets with our coullours sweete the Aire of Fraunce.
Enter Lodwike.
Lo. My liege, the Countesse with a smiling cheere.
Desires accesse vnto your Maiestie.
930King. Why there it goes, that verie smile of hers,
Hath