Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Grechen Minton
Not Peer Reviewed

Much Ado About Nothing (Quarto 1, 1600)


about Nothing.
Prince And as I wooed for thee to obtaine her, I wil ioyne
with thee, to disgrace her.
Bastard I will disparage her no farther, till you are my wit-
nesses, beare it coldely but till midnight, and let the issue shew
1325it selfe.
Prince O day vntowardly turned!
Claud. O mischiefe strangely thwarting!
Bastard O plague right well preuented! so will you say,
when you haue seene the sequele.

1330
Enter Dogbery and his compartner with the Watch.
Dog. Are you good men and true?
Verges Yea, or else it were pitty but they should suffer sal-
uation body and soule.
Dog. Nay, that were a punishment too good for them, if
1335they should haue any allegeance in them, being chosen for the
Princes watch.
Verges Well, giue them their charge, neighbour Dog-
bery.
Dogbery First, who thinke you the most desartlesse man
1340to be Constable?
Watch 1 Hugh Ote-cake sir, or George Sea-cole, for they
can write and reade.
Dogbery Come hither neighbor Sea-cole. God hath blest
you with a good name: to be a welfauoured man, is the gift of
1345Fortune, but to write and reade, comes by nature.
Watch 2 Both which maister Constable.
Dogbery You haue: I knew it would be your answer: wel,
for your fauour sir, why giue God thanks, and make no boast
1350of it, and for your writing and reading, let that appeere when
there is no neede of such vanity, you are thought heere to be
the most senslesse and fit man for the Constable of the watch:
therefore beare you the lanthorne: this is your charge, You
shall comprehend all vagrom men, you are to bidde any man
1355stand, in the Princes name.
Watch 2 How if a will not stand?
Dogbery Why then take no note of him, but let him goe,
E3
and