Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Grechen Minton
Not Peer Reviewed

Much Ado About Nothing (Quarto 1, 1600)


about Nothing.
Clau. If he be not in loue with some woman, there is no be-
leeuing old signes, a brushes his hat a mornings, what should
1245that bode?
Prince Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?
Clau. No, but the barbers man hath bin seene with him,
and the olde ornament of his cheeke hath already stufft tennis
balls.
1250Leon. Indeed he lookes yonger than he did, by the losse of
a beard.
Prince Nay a rubs himselfe with ciuit, can you smell him
out by that?
Claud. Thats as much as to say, the sweete youthe's in
1255loue.
Bene. The greatest note of it is his melancholy.
Claud. And when was he woont to wash his face?
Prince Yea or to paint himselfe? for the which I heare what
they say of him.
1260Claud. Nay but his iesting spirit, which is now crept into a
lute-string, and now gouernd by stops.
Prince Indeed that tells a heauy tale for him: conclude, con-
clude, he is in loue.
Claud. Nay but I know who loues him.
1265Prince That would I know too, I warrant one that knows
him not.
Claud. Yes, and his ill conditions, and in dispight of al, dies
for him.
Prince She shall be buried with her face vpwards.
1270Bene. Yet is this no charme for the tooth-ake, old signior,
walke aside with me, I haue studied eight or nine wise wordes
to speake to you, which these hobby-horses must not heare.
Prince For my life to breake with him about Beatrice.
1275Claud. Tis euen so, Hero and Margaret haue by this played
their parts with Beatrice, and then the two beares will not
bite one another when they meete.
Enter Iohn the Bastard.
Bastard My lord and brother, God saue you.
1280Prince Good den brother.
E2
Bastard