Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Not Peer Reviewed

Henry VI, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1594)


The first part of the contention of the two famous
1715Then by iust proofe you can affirme,
1715.1For as the sucking childe or harmlesse lambe,
So is he innocent of treason to our state.
Enter Suffolke.
How now Suffolke, where's our vnkle?
1725Suffolke. Dead in his bed, my Lord Gloster is dead.
The King falles in a sound.
1730Queen. Ay-me, the King is dead: help, help, my Lords.
Suffolke. Comfort my Lord, gratious Henry comfort.
Kin. What doth my Lord of Suffolk bid me comfort?
1740Came he euen now to sing a Rauens note,
And thinkes he that the cherping of a Wren,
By crying comfort through a hollow voice,
Can satisfie my griefes, or ease my heart:
Thou balefull messenger out of my sight,
For euen in thine eye-bals murther sits,
Yet do not goe. Come Basaliske
And kill the silly gazer with thy lookes.
Queene. Why do you rate my Lord of Suffolke thus,
As if that he had causde Duke Humphreys death?
The Duke and I too, you know were enemies,
1760And you had best say that I did murther him.
King. Ah woe is me, for wretched Glosters death.
Queene. Be woe for me more wretched then he was,
What doest thou turne away and hide thy face?
1775I am no loathsome leoper looke on me,
Was I for this nigh wrackt vpon the sea,
And thrise by aukward winds driuen back from Englands bounds,
1785What might it bode, but that well foretelling
Winds, said, seeke not a scorpions neast.
Enter the Earles of Warwicke and Salisbury.
War. My Lord, the Commons like an angrie hiue of bees,
1827.1Run vp and downe, caring not whom they sting,
1825For good Duke Humphreys death, whom they report
To be murthered by Suffolke and the Cardinall here.
King. That he is dead good Warwick, is too true,
But how he died God knowes, not Henry.
War. Enter his priuie chamber my Lord and view the bodie.
Good