Internet Shakespeare Editions

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: Rosemary Gaby
Not Peer Reviewed

Henry IV, Part 2 (Quarto 1, 1598).


The second part of
My Lord Northumberland wil soone be coold.
King O God that one might reade the booke of fate,
And see the reuolution of the times,
Make mountaines leuell, and the continent
1470Weary of solide firmenesse melt it selfe
Into the sea, and other times to see,
The beachie girdle of the ocean,
Too wide for Neptunes hips, how chances mockes,
And changes fill the cup of alteration,
1475With diuers liquors! O if this were seene,
1475.1The happiest youth viewing his progresse through,
What perills past, what crosses to ensue?
Would shut the booke and sit him downe and die:
Tis not ten yeeres gone,
Since Richard and Northumberland great friends,
Did feast togither, and in two yeare after,
Were they at warres: it is but eight yeares since,
This Percie was the man neerest my soule,
1480Who like a brother toyld in my affaires;
And laied his loue and life vnder my foote,
Yea for my sake, euen to the eyes of Richard,
Gaue him defyance: but which of you was by?
You cousen Neuel, (as I may remember)
1485When Richard with his eye-brimme full of teares,
Then checkt and rated by Northumberland,
Did speake these wordes now proou'd a prophecie:
Northumberland, thou ladder by the which
My cousen Bolingbrooke ascends my throne,
1490(Though then (God knowes) I had no such intent,
But that necessitie so bowed the state,
That I and greatnesse were compeld to kisse.)
The time shall come, thus did he follow it,
The time wil come, that foule sin gathering head,
1495Shall breake into corruption: so went on,
Fortelling this same times condition,
And